Practice writing Chinese characters (Exercise 2)

Carnations

Carnations

Today we will practice writing 10 words used in the “Two Odd Tigers” song discussed in Chapter 1 of “Learn Chinese through Songs and Rhymes“. Please print out the sheet at the following link:
Chinese Character Tracing 6

Trace over the fainter characters to become familiar with the position of each stroke then write the character in the three blank spaces yourself.

Details about the types of strokes you will encounter in Chinese characters and the correct stroke order can be found at this link.

By the way, Mother’s Day is coming up. To my own dear mother in heaven:

这朵鲜花献给您.
Zhè duǒ xiānhuā xiàn gěi nín;
This carnation I offer you today,

您看不到, 也听不见.
Nín kàn bù dào, yě tīng bù jiàn.
But you cannot see, nor can you hear.

但盼天使捎个信
Dàn pàn tiānshǐ shāo gè xìn,
Hope the angels will relay

遥传我们的思念.
Yáo chuán wǒmén de sīniàn.
How much you’re missed by all of us here.

Those of you who are fortunate to still have your mother and/or grandmother around, don’t forget to express your love to them in a way they can appreciate. Come to think of it, have you noticed that, when inverted, MOM becomes “WOW”?

母亲节快乐!
Mǔqīnjié kuàilè!
Have a Happy Mother’s Day!

Practice writing Chinese characters (Exercise 1)

Chinese Character Stroke Order

If you are sitting at home waiting out the novel corona virus pandemic, why not use some of the extra time on hand to practice writing Chinese characters. The picture showing the stroke order for writing the character is taken from the book “Learn Chinese through Songs and Rhymes”. (yǒng) means forever or always. This character incorporates all the possible types of strokes you might encounter in a Chinese character. The general rule for the stroke order is from the top to the bottom and from the left to the right. In addition, when a horizontal stroke intersects a vertical stroke to form a cross shape, you will write the horizontal stroke first. For a box shape, write the vertical stroke on the left side first.

Below is a sheet you can print out. It contains 10 simple Chinese characters. Take a look at each character and determine the proper stroke order to use. For example, with (rén person), you would begin with the stroke on the left side then add the stroke on the right side. With (dà big, great), you would first put in the horizontal stroke then write the (rén person) character. With (tiān sky, heaven), you would write a short horizontal stroke, followed by the (dà big, great) character.

Trace over the fainter characters to become familiar with the position of each stroke. Finally, write the character in the three blank spaces yourself. Each character should look neat and “together” rather than just a bunch of random strokes. Practice until what you write approximates the provided master copy.

Chinese Character Tracing 2

Details about the types of strokes you will encounter in Chinese characters and the correct stroke order can be found at this link.

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