Sing Que Sera Sera in Chinese

Some Chinese people believe that everyone’s fate is compiled in a celestial book called 天書 (tiānshū). In fact, the main character in the novel titled 红楼梦 (Hónglóumèng Dream of the Red Mansion) managed to get a glimpse of this heavenly book in one of his dreams. As 天書 (tiānshū) is in Chinese, the more reason for you to master the written Chinese language. Just kidding.

You’ve probably wondered why you are who you are, where you are and how you are. Is it all in the genes, is it due to your parents’ and your own efforts, or is it the outcome of a predetermined sequence of cause and effect admixed with a bit of magic at times? We will leave the argument of nature versus nurture to the philosophers. The correct answer for us today is, “Que sera sera.” That’s Spanish for “What will be, will be.”

“Que Sera Sera” is a song written by the Jay Livingston and Ray Evans songwriting team and made internationally popular by the adorable Doris Day. The lively tune buoys our spirits despite the fact that there is not really an answer to the big question. Click on this link to hear the Mandarin version performed by Teresa Deng.

The Mandarin lyrics can be found at this link.

世事 (shìshì) is the abbreviation of 世界上的事 (shìjiè shàng de shì), i.e. the affairs of life. Therefore 世事多变化. (Shìshì duō biànhuà.) means things in life change.

(wèn) means to ask. 问题 (wèntí) are questions. 好些问题 (hǎoxiē wèntí) means a good deal of questions.

将来 (jiānglái) means the future or in the future.
幸福 (xìngfú) means well-being or living happily.
或是 (huò shì) means or, perhaps.

有一番道理 (yǒu yī fān dàoli) means makes sense. You could also say 有道理 (yǒu dàoli).

未来 (wèilái future) means the future or future (adjective). 怎能 (zěn néng) means “how could one”. 料得及 (liào de jí) means able to predict. The complete line means “How could one predict the future?”

人生 (rénshēng) is life. 本是 (běn shì) is short for 本来是 (běnlái shì) means “after all is”. (mí) is a riddle. So, life is after all a riddle.

结婚后 (jiéhūn hòu) means “after getting married”. 夫唱妇又随 (fū chàng fù yòu suí) comes from the Chinese idiom 夫唱妇随 (fū chàng fù suí), which literally translates to: “The husband sings and the wife follows.” The traditional Chinese view is that a good wife should dance to her husband’s tune. This line describes a harmonious married life.

不止一回 (bùzhǐ yī huí) means not just once, or more than once.
是否永久 (shìfǒu yǒngjiǔ) means “whether or not if will be forever”.
多虑 (duō lǜ) means worrying too much.

现在的 (xiànzài de) is an adjective that means current or present. 儿女 (érnǚ) are one’s children.

伶俐 (língli) means bright and clever.

提起好些问题 (tíqǐ hǎoxiē wèntí) means to raise quite a few questions.

前途 (qiántú) is one’s future or prospect. 如意 (rúyì) means to have one’s wishes fulfilled.

(quàn) is to advise or to persuade somebody.

(mò) is the formal word for “don’t”, “not” or “no”. 莫多虑 (Mò duō lǜ.) means “Don’t worry too much.” In everyday speech, you would say: 別想太多. (Bié xiǎng tàiduō. Don’t think too much.)

May the New Year bring you health, happiness and good fortune!

新年如意
Xīnnián rúyì!
May your wishes come true in the new year!

Good Feelings in Chinese

含苞待放 (hánbāo dài fàng) Waiting to bloom

含苞待放 (hánbāo dài fàng) Camellia buds waiting to bloom


From the many holiday wishes that we have come across at this blog site, you already know that 快乐 (kuàilè happy) and 愉快 (yúkuài joyful, cheerful) are happy feelings. Another common expression for feeling happy is 开心 (kāixīn).

明天詹姆士要来看我, 真开心.
Míngtiān Zhānmǔshì yào lái kàn wǒ, zhēn kāixīn.
James is coming to see me tomorrow; I’m so delighted.

有好感 (yǒu hǎogǎn) means to have a favorable impression or opinion of someone. 欣赏 (xīnshǎng) is to appreciate or admire someone. You would also use this word for appreciation of art or music.

我欣赏她的才能.
Wǒ xīnshǎng tā de cáinéng.
I admire her talents and abilities.

佩服 (pèifú) means to admire someone’s abilities or good qualities. 敬佩 (jìngpèi) is to admire and hold in high esteem. Same with 仰慕 (yǎngmù). The word means to look up to. At the highest level is 崇拜 (chóngbài), which means to adore or worship.

我佩服你的勇气.
Wǒ pèifú nǐ de yǒngqì.
I admire your courage.

兴致 (xìngzhì) is the mood for enjoying something.

今天爷爷兴致大, 多玩了几圈麻将.
Jīntiān yéye xìngzhì dà, duō wán le jǐquān májiàng.
Grandpa was in a good mood today and played a few extra rounds of mahjong.

兴奋 (xīngfèn) means to be excited about something, usually in a happy sense.

得意 (déyì) means to be pleased with oneself, or to have things going one’s way.

他升了两级, 得意洋洋.
Tā shēng le liǎng jí, deyìyángyáng.
He went up two ranks and was elated.

自豪 (zìháo) means to be proud of oneself.

这是他引以自豪的一篇文章.
Zhè shì tā yǐn yǐ zìháo de yīpiān wénzhāng.
This is an article of his that he is proud of.

中意 (zhòngyì) and 合意 (héyì) both mean “to one’s liking”, while 满意 (mǎnyì) means to be pleased or satisfied.

轻松 (qīngsōng) means to feel relaxed. 轻松的心情 (qīngsōng de xīnqíng) is a relaxed mood. 轻松的工作 (qīngsōng de gōngzuò) means a light task or an easy job.

自在 (zìzai) means to feel at ease and comfortable with one’s surroundings.

放心 (fàngxīn) means to be relieved of concerns or worries.

你放心, 我不会告诉他.
Nǐ fàngxīn, wǒ bùhuì gàosù tā.
Rest assured, I won’t tell him.

安心 (ānxīn) means to have peace of mind and not feel troubled.

你安心睡吧.
Nǐ ānxīn shuì ba.
Don’t worry; sleep well.

幸福 (xìngfú) means one’s well-being, or a feeling of being favored by good fortune.

祝你们永远幸福.
Zhù nǐmen yǒngyuǎn xìngfú.
Hope you will always be happy.

Finally, happy is the heart that is filled with hope, or 希望 (xīwàng). Hope confers additional pupose to life. Like a bud waiting to blossom, or 含苞待放 (hánbāo dài fàng), hope gives us something to look forward to.

我心中充满了希望.
Wǒ xīn zhōng chōngmǎn xīwàng.
My heart is filled with hope.

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