Raindrops in Spring

雨 (yǔ) Rain

雨 (yǔ) Rain

It just dawned on me that the witches I’ve seen in pictures and movies all seem so feisty and energetic. The secret to their vigor and stamina may well be in their brooms, which they ride to zip across the sky, and which they perhaps also use to madly sweep away anything they detest. So, grab your own broom and do some spring cleaning. 整理庭院 (zhěnglǐ tíngyàn doing yard work) and 做家事 (zuò jiāshì doing housework) also count as exercises, you know. In fact, when you sweep backwards using a broom, the motions are not unlike those of rowing a boat, or 划船 (huáchuán).

Then come back and enjoy a nifty ditty, 三月里的小雨 (Sānyuè Li De Xiǎoyǔ Light Rain in March), sung by 劉文正 (Liú Wénzhèng).

三月里 (sānyuè li) means “in the month of March”.

小雨 (xiǎoyǔ) is a light rain. 下雨 (xiàyǔ) means to rain.

淅沥 (xī lì) and 哗啦 (huālā) mimick the sound of the falling rain and rustling leaves, respectively. Often they appear together as 淅瀝哗啦 (xī lì huālā).

(tíng) is to stop. 不停 (bùtíng) means incessantly. 下个不停 (xià ge bùtíng) describes how the rain falls relentlessly. Here, (ge) takes on the “silent tone” and serves as a colloquial word particle rather than a unit of measure. Now you should know how to say “He sings non-stop.”

山谷里 (shāngǔ li) means “in the mountain valley”.

小溪 (xiǎoxī) is a brook, a rivulet, or a small stream.

为谁 (wèi shéi) means “for whom”.

(piāo) is to flutter or float in air. (liú) is to flow or to drift. As a noun it refers to a current or a stream of fluid. 飘流 (piāo liú) means to wander or to drift around.

(dài) as a verb means to carry, to bring, or to take along.

请把这本书带去给他.
Qǐng bǎ zhè běn shū dài qù gěi tā.
Please take this book to him.

带著满怀的凄清 (mǎnhuái de qī qīng) means carrying a heart full of desolate feelings.

陪伴 (péibàn) means to keep someone company.

(tīng) is to hear or listen.

(sù) is to tell, inform, complain or accuse.

他告诉我, 他的志趣在教书.
Tā gàosù wǒ, tā de zhìqù zài jiāoshú.
He told me his interests are in teaching school.

可知 (kě zhī) could be interpreted here as “do they know”. The rain keeps you company, the brook listens to your muttering, but do they know the loneliness in your heart?

寂寞 (jìmò) means lonely or loneliness.

请问小溪 (qǐngwèn) could be interpreted as: “I’d like to ask the little brook”

追寻 (zhuīxún) means to search for or to pursue.

一颗 (yī kē) is the unit of measure for the heart in the phrase 爱我的心 (ài wǒ de xīn the heart that loves me).

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